When it comes to designing your Florida home, a lot goes into your choices, so it makes sense for those decisions to have some lasting power. As trends come and go, it could get tricky to find that balance, so before you start pinning ideas like crazy on Pinterest, we’ve got some suggestions to help your home look fresh now and for years to come. As an example, let’s first take a look at a Florida home that’s gotten a facelift.

HISTORIC TO TIMELESS

As told by Ken Wysocky for Traditional Home, architect Jeff Smith and designer Sherrill Canet were commissioned not long ago to update an historic home in the heart of Palm Beach, Florida, their goal to refresh it tastefully with a look to last. Built in 1923 for American industrialist John S. Pillsbury, the house’s rustic look was in need of a makeover. Smith’s remodel included demolishing one wing as well as a slate of smaller rooms on the main home’s multilevel second floor. This made way for an addition to the main floor for a larger kitchen, family room and breakfast room, as well as space for seven bedrooms—all on one level—plus a sitting area upstairs. Their aim, as Canet shares, was to make the house more comfortable for a very large family where multiple seating areas can give people a chance to enjoy private time. Among the updates:

  • In the remodeled kitchen, a U-shape walnut island and brushed-steel range hood serve as striking visual anchors. Outside, they added a whitewashed, millwork-clad ceiling to give an ageless look to the porch.
  • In the breakfast room, they kept as many original materials as possible in order to preserve that Mediterranean flavor, such as terra-cotta tiles and wood flooring. Then they installed stenciled beam ceilings, an exposed exterior staircase, cast-stone ornamentation, and tile floors to maintain the home’s design continuity in the new spaces, while maintaining its heritage.
  • Imported ceramic tiles from Portugal brighten the new, sun-drenched breakfast room while paying homage to original tile in other rooms. A timeless balance was created in this historic home.
  • The team added ornate cast iron outer doors to lend architectural panache.

LAYER IT ON

Keep in mind that design isn’t just one choice, but many options working together in harmony. While It may not feel as exciting to use classic materials for your home, you can easily layer on more design elements to create the look and style you desire. Put a neutral backdrop together with easy colors and style in flooring, cabinetry and paint choices. This will help other big design choices “pop” while minimizing that cluttered appearance in your home. A neutral backdrop, recommends Demlang Builders, also helps you play up seasonal décor, giving you the chance to represent temperature and color changes happening up north while maintaining the basics of Florida style.

REMEMBER FOCAL POINTS

A great way to embrace a trend and turn it into something timeless is to make just a few simple focal points in a room rather than using the trend throughout the space. For example, light fixtures will look nicer longer using recessed lighting, then incorporate a creative light fixture that allows you to invent a look that can be changed out as trends come and go! The same thing goes for furniture. A large sectional couch in a neutral color will take care of seating, while a stylish, extravagant armchair easily becomes the focal point of a room.

A FEW TRENDS

In case you were wondering what is trending for 2020 in home design, AuthenticInteriors.com’s Aida Sniraite reports from 2019 Milan Design Week that looks will center on wellbeing, comfort and sustainability to balance off all the Smart Home technologies that will increasingly find a place in our homes. Art Deco will also play a part in the balancing act of contrasting old and new next year.

At J. Sweet Construction, we put 20 years of construction and remodeling experience to work for you to create timeless looks for your Florida home. Give us a call to see how we can help you create and maintain a home that will last for generations.